Obesity
The prevalence of obesity among American men has doubled in only 25 years, and it’s killing us. A 2004 survey published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 71% of men 20 years old and over were overweight and 31% were obese. The same survey conducted in the late 1970s had found 47% of men were overweight and 15% were obese.

What is Obesity
If doctors tell you you’re obese, they’re not trying to make you feel bad. They’re using a specific medical term — obesity — to talk with you about your weight.

The word “obesity” means too much body fat. It’s usually based on your body mass index (BMI), which you can check using a BMI calculator. BMI compares your weight to your height. If your BMI is 25 to 29.9, you’re overweight but not obese. A BMI of 30 or more is in the obese range.

Obesity can affect your health:

Small Changes Can Help
The good news is that you can take steps to lose weight. And losing even some weight can make a big difference to your health and how you feel. You may not have to lose as much as you might think in order to start seeing health benefits.

As a start, aim to lose 1-2 pounds a week. Adults who are overweight or obese should try to lose 5% to 10% of their current weight over 6 months, according to the National HeartLung, and Blood Institute.

If you’re ready to get started with a weight loss program, ask your doctor to help you set personal goals and refer you to other professionals who can give you tips and help you reach your goals. For example, a nutritionist can help you with a food plan, and a physical therapist or trainer can help you move more.

You’ll want to go for steady progress over time, and to make lifestyle changes that work for you for the long run. That way you can start losing weight and feel better.

Related Links to Obesity 

WebMD.com/diet/obesity

CDC.gov/obesity

Obesity.org

NHLBI.nih.gov/health-topics/overweight-and-obesity

 

* All information, content, and material of this website is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider.